COMIC BOOK FANS OF THE WORLD UNITE AS FREE COMIC BOOK DAY IS COMING!!

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This Saturday May 7th, the Gods of Comics look favourably on their mortal subjects as Free Comic Book day is Nigh! Free? Yes free, it’s basically Christmas without the awkward cracker jokes and granny sleeping on the sofa. Just walk into your participating neighbourhood comic store and an arsenal of comic bad-assery will be yours for the taking. So seize the day people, steel your nerves, get that cape on, bring your utility belt and wear your cosplay like Batman wears his Mech Suit.

50 titles we be available on the day completely free. Check out the list of titles here

You can also learn more about Free Comic Book Day here

Find your nearest participating comic book store here

There’s no hiding that the StoryCube team are massive comic fans and we especially cannot wait to see the new Doctor Who and Suicide Squad releases. We’re so excited that we just had to do something to join in on the fandom.

So what are we going to do???

FREE BATMAN COMISSION

Comic book fans will receive an exclusive Batman Illustration by Jorge Corona. Just visit in-store and get your copy. (limited quantity)

Get your own Batman StoryCubes here


OOO-WEE-OOOOOOOOOO EEE-YOO-OOOOOOOOOO

If you just heard the Doctor Who theme tune, congratulations you have passed the first test.

We were in touch with the good Doctor as he has been using our Dr Who StoryCubes to warm Ashildr’s heart. The Doctor did have some bad news to break to us. Well it’s all about perspective really and within time and space that can change on where/when you are. Leaving Gallifrey on his way back to Earth the TARDIS hit some turbulence in Space-time and as a result 4 of our Exclusive Doctor Who StoryCubes sets have travelled back in time before their official release this September.

In 4 stores across Europe there is one special pre release copy of Doctor Who StoryCubes. 4 lucky fans will be the only four people in the world to own a set of Doctor Who StoryCubes before they are available to buy.

What do you have to do?

Attend Free Comic Book Day at one of our participating comic book stores, get your hands on a copy of the New Dr Who comic, and if the Time Lords will it, you will be chosen as a winner.

Participating Comic Book Stores

Travelling Man (Leeds)

Forbidden Planet (Dublin)

Comic Book Guys(Belfast)

Cellules Grises (Evry, France)

Big Bang Comics (Dublin)

PLEASE THE TIME LORDS AND A SET COULD BE YOURS!

DON'T FORGET TO SHARE YOUR PHOTOS WITH US ON TWITTER AND FACEBOOK, JUST TAG US OR USE THE HASHTAG #STORYCUBES

Wednesday, 04 May 2016

Play With Your Food, It's good for you

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Irish Storytelling company bucks trend and encourages you to play with your food.

Today, in a bid to improve the recommended daily intake of calcium for children ages 6-12 and to promote creativity, quality time together and more meaningful meal times, the leading storytelling games publisher Rory’s Story Cubes® has launched an edible cheese version of their creative storytelling game.

Roll the dice, tell a story and then eat it, it’s a simple as that. The age old problem of young children playing with their food and making Picasso-like creations on the dinner table has been solved. Parents will rejoice, meal times will be less chaotic and carpets will be saved.

There is a serious point to this game though. Research from the World Health Organisation (W.H.O) has shown that there has been a worldwide increase in osteoporosis cases, with young children being at the top of the scale. The recommended daily intake of calcium (the bone-building nutrient) to promote strong bones and teeth is 1000mg per day, but sadly current reports show that the general intake is a staggeringly low 300mg average per child. Enter Rory’s Story Cubes®, who have turned their creative storytelling game into a calcium rich cheese game designed specifically for play at meal times.

Rory’s Story Cubes® Head of Sales & Marketing Candida Corscadden, is passionate about the new direction for the company and its new product, ‘’ Over the years we have seen how important meaningful play is in the development of young people. We have also listened to the feedback from our customers and fans who have shared their meal time woes with us. Parents need a meal time activity that is fun, creative but also nutritious. Our Rory’s Story Cubes® Cheese is the answer to these woes and we are very excited about launching them this year’’.

Are there any dangers with this new product? No, it is perfectly safe and delicious, a word of warning though, initial research has shown if eaten before bed-time, the stories told will promote cheese related nightmares. The team suggest that Rory’s Story Cubes® Cheese are not eaten after 8pm.

Alessandra Bingham, a mother to two boys and one girl in Ohio has been using Rory’s Story Cubes® Cheese in a pre-release trial. ‘‘These cubes are amazing, for the first time in two years there has been calm at the dinner table, we roll our cheese cubes, tell a story and then add them to our pizza. The kids love the gorgonzola flavour the best and always want to tell more stories. I know they’re getting their daily calcium intake which really puts me at ease’’

What are StoryCubes? Rory’s Story Cubes® is a pocket sized story generator. Simply roll the nine dice and begin your story, ‘Once upon a time….’ and use the embossed images (fifty-four of them) to spark your imagination. They are a fantastic, fun way to inspire creative thinking, encourage social confidence, develop language, improve vocabulary and promote problem solving skills for ages six and above.

For StoryCube recipes and to learn more about Rory’s Story Cubes® you can get in touch with their brand manager, Jamie Stinson, [email protected] or check out their website storycubes.com

Friday, 01 April 2016

Queen Victoria Fights Genghis Khan in Space!

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We bet that's a headline you didn't expect to come up in your feed? Well, let us explain and you'll see how we got there...

Last weekend The Rory's StoryCubes® team attended London Super Comic Con at Excel for the very first time and what an event it was. Fans were given the first sneak peaks of our new StoryWorlds range which includes Dr Who, Scooby Doo and Looney Tunes. London Super Comic Con was packed full of fans, writers, illustrators, collectors and much much more; ultimately it was a giant Smörgåsbord of comic fun and fandom.

We met lots of artists from different genres and styles who loved our new StoryWorld sets, so much so that they were inspired to roll the dice and create some terrific and wonderous new artworks, some of which clashed a few worlds together.

KATIE COOK @katiecandraw

Katie Cook rolled our Moomin, Batman, Dr Who and Original range Storycubes to create these quirky and endearing illustrations. Kaite is an American comic artist/illustrator who is also a writer on My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic.

Mr Hope www.misterhope.com

Mr Hope is a British Illustrator who is currently working with New York Times bestselling author, Thomas E Sniegoski and is a frequent exhibitor at the Leeds Thought Bubble Sequential Art Festival. Mr Hope rolled our Batman StoryCubes to create a scene with Dr Harlene Frances Quinzell and the Joker.

Mike Collins @mikecollins99

And here is how we arrive at the title of this Article. Mike Collins is a British comic book artist, a penciller for Dr Who Magazine and has worked on DC and 2000 AD titles. Mike also introduced Gambit into the Marvel Universe and is a storyboarder for Dr Who and Warhammer 40K. Here he rolls our Dr Who set to create a truly fantastic scene featuring Queen Victoria fighting Ghenghis Khan in Space. To the BBC, if you happen to be reading this, we need to see this episode happen.


As it has only been a few days since London Super Comic Con, we still have a few more artworks to receive, so stay tuned and watch out for part two of this article. As a taster lets see if you can imagine the scenes from these rolls?

What Are Rory's StoryCubes?

Rory’s Story Cubes is a pocket sized story generator. Simply roll the nine dice and begin your story, ‘Once upon a time….’ and use the embossed images (fifty four of them) to spark your imagination. There are no right or wrong answers, anyone can become a great storyteller. They are a fantastic, fun way to inspire creative thinking, encourage social confidence, develop language, improve vocabulary and promote problem solving skills for ages six and above. Presented in a compact magnetic box Rory’s Story Cubes are perfect for travel, waiting in a restaurant in the classroom, as an icebreaker, for idea generation, or to make learning a new language more fun – the uses are endless. Each set can also be added to with Mix sets. Mix are three cube sets that introduce a new theme or genre to your storytelling. Craft tales of cracking crime with the Clues set, conjure fantastic fairytales with Enchanted and weave tales of primeval predators with Prehistoria. Rory's Story Cubes also have their own licensed sets including Batman, Moomin, Dr Who, Looney Tunes and Scooby Doo.

If you have used StoryCubes and have a story to share with us, then we would love to hear from you. Simply drop an email to [email protected]

Friday, 26 February 2016

Australian Unleashes Creativity in The Heart of China

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T.E.F.L EDUCATOR IGNITES CREATIVITY IN CHINESE SCHOOL WITH RORY'S STORY CUBES

Today, Australian expat Chris Edwards based in the Shenzhen in China teaches English as a foreign language to over two hundred students at Beihuan Middle School in Guangdong province of China. Using Rory’s Story Cubes®, a nine dice story-telling game, Chris has broken down barriers and climbed the proverbial Great Wall to unleash creativity in his students, leaving them inspired, empowered and ready to develop their full potential.

Thirty four year old Chris Edwards left his home town Perth in Australia two and a half years ago, crossing the South China Sea to teach English in China. Residing at Beihuan Middle School in Shenzhen, the fourth largest city in China in Guangdong Province, Chris teaches a class size in excess of twenty grade 7 (12yrs) students at a time.

English as a foreign language is taught across schools in China and is seen as a necessary tool in the young academic's toolkit. As the gates of China are unlocked and slowly opened opened to the western world, the need to converse in the language of business is apparent. Children educated in monochronic cultures have little exposure to creative outlets and have less opportunity to explore and express themselves creatively; but as we find out, as a linear culture does not primarily focus on creativity and empathy this does not mean it isn’t there, lying dormant, awaiting to be awakened.

Enter Chris Edwards, a champion of change and a beacon in the mist for creative wanderers. As we sit on our video call, you can see and hear the clear enthusiasm and passion Chris has for teaching and for his students. If the meeting were in person, we just know he would be gesturing and leaping across the room, acting out sequences, re-telling the tales of his students and his experiences. Edwards frankly comments ‘’People think Chinese students are not creative, but this is not true. They aren’t allowed much opportunity to be creative’’. Edwards sees the potential in creative expression and knows it imbues qualities such as resilience, self-esteem and empathy. Using Rory’s Story Cubes, Chris holds group story-telling sessions in his classroom, where students can learn English through the medium of Story-telling. Chris tells us that ‘Rory’s Story Cubes unleashes creativity in my students’ and has found a change in some of his students as they find their creative fires are ignited and demonstrated in all areas of their creative work.

‘’People think Chinese students are not creative, but this is not true. They aren’t allowed much opportunity to be creative’’


What are Rory's StoryCubes?

Rory’s Story Cubes is a pocket sized story generator. Simply roll the nine dice and begin your story, ‘Once upon a time….’ and use the embossed images (fifty four of them) to spark your imagination. There are no right or wrong answers, anyone can become a great storyteller. They are a fantastic, fun way to inspire creative thinking, encourage social confidence, develop language, improve vocabulary and promote problem solving skills for ages six and above. Presented in a compact magnetic box Rory’s Story Cubes are perfect for travel, waiting in a restaurant in the classroom, as an icebreaker, for idea generation, or to make learning a new language more fun – the uses are endless. Each set can also be added to with Mix sets. Mix are three cube sets that introduce a new theme or genre to your storytelling. Craft tales of cracking crime with the Clues set, conjure fantastic fairytales with Enchanted and weave tales of primeval predators with Prehistoria. Rory's Story Cubes also have their own licensed sets including Batman, Moomin, Dr Who, Looney Tunes and Scooby Doo.

Back to the story. We are a good hour into our call and have yet to hear how Chris uses Rory's StoryCubes, but finally we reach that point. How does one create stories with students whilst maintaining egalitarianism and that notion of the group working as a whole, a notion so strong in Chinese culture? This is where Chris takes over in the article, I’ll step out and make a cup of tea, while you read this

Idea Generation

‘I decided to start with the Original set as the base, with occasional forays in to other sets as occasions dictated. The classroom breaks up into six groups with a maximum group size of four students. Encouraging group work is something that all teaching methods agree on. Using a digital projector, I would roll the cubes on the projector, which would then display the dice and their icons on to a smart board for all students to see and interpret. I would give students two to three hints about what the pictures could represent to encourage alternative thinking. If they have their own ideas about what the pictures mean, the students would be encouraged to use those instead of my thoughts – and some students did; independent thinking is always encouraged.

Each group received a small blackboard that was about A2 size and some chalk. I usually gave the students six to seven minutes to meet the target additions to the story (two to four sentences was my normal requirement for the classes). If they could write more, that was even better, and some students could write a lot in a short period.'


Story Collection and Voting


'After some time, each story board was collected and presented, so everyone could see the story ideas everyone had generated. The students would voice their opinions with either “Yes”, “No” or “Maybe”. Three or more ‘No’s’ from the group was considered for removal from the list of potential answers. Three or more ‘Yes’ votes put that story idea in the final list for selection. Three or more ‘Maybe’ votes were allowed in case there were no ‘Yes’ votes.'

'Students voted on how the story continued based on the submissions that their classmates wrote, however they could not vote for their own submissions, thereby eliminating some bias. but obviously, (there will obviously be some internal bias between friends sitting in different groups, such is the dynamic of a classroom)'

'On some occasions, class would run over time, or there would be a tied vote. In situations like this, I would opt to combine the popular submissions into one piece. Many classes enjoyed this approach and it challenged my own abilities to interpret what they had written.'

Hello again dear reader, I’m back. OK so where were we? Ah yes, the story-telling:

After each story-telling session Chris would populate a spreadsheet of all the stories and track their development across the school semester, he initially started populating a PowerPoint presentation, but as each student became accustomed to the story-telling process and more empowered to add their own perspective, story-telling shifted from an arbitrary linking of icons to a deep and contextually rich process, where worlds and characters were being created.

Chris sees the change manifesting in his students. ‘I displayed the stories on the walls of my classroom. Each week the stories grew exponentially like Hedera Ivy. As the stories were displayed physically, students would read them all even it it wasn’t theirs, because they had a genuine interest in what different classes were writing.’

‘Making the games tangible by simply placing them on a wall empowers young students’


Deviating from the normal prescription of teaching English, Chris would soon attract the attention of his peers. Teaching staff would come into his class and look at the work of his students with awe and amazement; they could see the empowerment, the skill and creativity previously untapped now flourishing like a lily in a desert, organically and un-tempered.


A change has happened in China and Chris has seen this manifest in his students and carry into other parts of their lives. He hopes to collate all the stories from his time in China and create a book of stories.


‘I want the students to have something to take home for all their hard creative work over the school year. This shows them what they can do – and for some students, no one has ever told them that they can do it.’


Chris also wants parents to see the work of their children and take pride in them, but also he wants them to see his class, as not an opportunity to blow off steam but as a chance to be creative in a different way. The Foreign or ‘Waiguoren’ teacher is not just there as a foreigner, but there to provide a new perspective; a new way; and a window to other cultures, helping them for their roles in the world of tomorrow and allowing a creative footprint for the future.

If you have used StoryCubes and have a story to share with us, or are an educator interested in learning more, then we would love to hear from you. Simply drop us an email to [email protected] .

Monday, 22 February 2016

The Creativity Hub at SPIEL 2015

The Creativity Hub team is at SPIEL 2015 in Essen, Germany this week, rolling Rory's Story Cubes, telling stories and jumping into the world of design with The Extraordinaires Design Studio.

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Thursday, 08 October 2015